October – Cabelands Cemetary

October_OV
Latitude 36º 2′ 34.90″ N/
October_CU/Longitude 78º 59′ 23.89″ W

How to get there:

DRIVING DIRECTIONS to Cabe Lands Cemetery  from I-85 North, Exit 170: at the bottom of the ramp, merge onto Hwy. 70. Stay on Hwy. 70 East for 1.5 miles. At the second stoplight, turn left onto Sparger Road. In ½ mile, you will cross over Interstate 85 and take your first left onto Howe Street. Continue on Howe St. for ½ mile. The Cabe Lands Access of Eno River State Park will be on the right. Park here in this gravel lot. The physical address is 4960 Howe Street, Durham NC 27705.

DRIVING DIRECTIONS to Cabe Lands Cemetery from 147 N & 15/501 N: take Exit 16A off 147 N or Exit 108D off 15/501 N. The exit ramp for 147 will merge into Exit 108D, stay in your lane. If you are coming from 15/501, get in the right lane. As you are coming up the exit ramp, stay in one of the two left lanes. At the top of the ramp, turn left onto Hillsborough Road. Stay straight on Hillsborough Rd. for 2.2 miles. Turn right onto Sparger Road. In ½ mile, you will cross over Interstate 85 and take your first left onto Howe Street. Continue on Howe St. for ½ mile. The Cabe Lands Access of Eno River State Park will be on the right. Park here in this gravel lot. The physical address is 4960 Howe Street, Durham NC 27705.

DRIVING DIRECTIONS to Cabe Lands Cemetery from I-85, Exit 173: at the bottom of the ramp, turn right and head north on Cole Mill Road away from Hillsborough Road. Stay straight on Cole Mill Rd. for approximately 2.4 miles. At the second stoplight, turn left onto Sparger Road (if you cross the river, then you have gone too far). Stay on Sparger Rd. for 1.3 miles and turn right onto Howe Street just before the bridge over Interstate 85. Continue on Howe St. for ½ mile. The Cabe Lands Access of Eno River State Park will be on the right. Park here in this gravel lot. The physical address is 4960 Howe Street, Durham NC 27705.

HIKING DIRECTIONS to Cabe Lands Cemetery: After parking and securing your belongings and vehicle, walk toward the northwest corner of the lot. Stop at the paved handicapped parking space. Look north toward the woods, you should see two trails heading away from the parking area. Take the unmarked trail on the right. Stay straight on this path for approximately 0.3 miles. The trail dead-ends at the Cabe Lands Cemetery, this month’s hidden gem.

About Cabelands Cemetary

The Cabe Lands Access of the state park is named for John Cabe, an influential member of the Eno River community. This short biography (http://ncpedia.org/biography/cabe-john) by Jean Bradley Anderson is a great place to get an overview of John Cabe and his family’s importance. He and many of his influential (Cabe, Shields & McCown) descendants are buried at this month’s hidden gem, the Cabe Lands Cemetery. Check out these two pages to view photos and read information about the marked gravestones:

http://cemeterycensus.com/nc/orng/cem103.htm

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2317920

Unfortunately, there has been vandalism of this site over the years, so not all of the gravestones listed are still in the field. Please be respectful during your visit and leave the stones untouched. The gravestone of Elizabeth G. Arnold and John Cabe McCown (bottom right photo) is a well-preserved stone at the Cabe Lands Cemetery. John was one of the owners of West Point Mill and built the still-preserved Greek-revival farmhouse there. He is the grandson of John Cabe, Esq. and son of Rachel Cabe and Moses McCown, owners of Cole Mill. His wife Elizabeth, died at a young age (possibly during childbirth), but not before they had a son—Moses Ellis McCown, who later became mayor of Durham—and a daughter—Mary Cabe McCown, who married William Lipscomb, also an owner of West Point Mill and later mayor of Durham.

The remnants of Cabe’s Mill and its mysterious arches (bottom left photo) can still be seen near the river off the Cabe Lands Trail. See Joe Liles’ detailed map for this month’s hidden gem.

Ghosts of the Eno

In the Cabelands stories abound about the family and how their spirits remain alive today.  There is a long abandoned family cemetery about 200 yards off of the trail by the Eno River. Although interesting, there is no aura to it. Graves are where the body returns to the earth and places for the living to visit the deceased. Spirits tend to hang out at places that hold the most significance to them.
The special spot for feeling the energies of the historical site is the homestead area at the edge of the bluff overlooking the Eno River. A massive oak tree lays just before the bluff. There is a distinct warm happy vibe to the land. I have visited the homesite area numerous times and gotten EVP [recordings] every time. A man, a woman, and a girl. The girl seems to be the most talkative. She appears as if she was standing right next to you. On another occasion a man’s voice was heard and you could make out the words: “noise, of about, miller, flags, and years.”

By Herb Englishman

Have you been there? We are having a contest to see who can make it to all 12 locations in 2014. If you go, bring a camera and upload a photo to our Flickr photostream. Tag your photo as “Hidden Gems of the Eno” (you must use quotes around it!) and be sure to title each photo with your first name and last initial. Send an email to calendar@enoriver.org to let us know you are participating in the contest. We will honor those who make it to all of the locations at our annual calendar celebration at the end of the year and give you a special gift!

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